Logo Wide

More Subsidies for Hospitals and Universities ?

Minister of Higher Education Bassam Ibrahim emphasized that the highest tier's pricing would not surpass 30 percent of private sector hospital rates.
More Subsidies for Hospitals and Universities ?

Minister of Higher Education Bassam Ibrahim disclosed the necessity of considering additional subsidies for university hospitals, alongside current governmental assistance. He revealed ongoing discussions and research regarding the segmentation of hospital remuneration into three tiers: a nearly 40 percent subsidized tier, a partially paid tier, and a fully paid tier.

He emphasized that the highest tier’s pricing would not surpass 30 percent of private sector hospital rates for services such as analyses, radiography, surgeries, and patient care. This initiative aligns with the government’s commitment to bolstering the healthcare sector amidst fiscal challenges exacerbated by the Syrian conflict. The Minister stated, “The government’s support encompasses diverse sectors, including education and healthcare. Given the fiscal imbalance resulting from decreased revenues amid wartime conditions, a revamped approach to higher education policy is imperative. This entails prioritizing self-sustainability, fostering partnerships with the private sector, investing in infrastructure, and advancing scientific research and development.”

According to the numbers   

During an exhaustive presentation led by Damascus University’s President, Muhammad Osama al-Jabban, he underscored that the internationally recognized expenditure on education as a percentage of GDP stands at 6 percent. However, in Syria, expenditure fluctuated between 3.8 and 6.2 percent from 2000 to 2010, plummeting to 1.9 percent in 2019 due to adverse conditions and prioritization of other sectors.

Jabban elaborated, stating that Damascus University’s budget, previously estimated at $143 million in 2009, peaked at $153 million in 2010 before declining to $72 million in 2011, reaching a mere $13 million by 2024. Of this, $5 million is allocated to academic and administrative salaries, while the remaining $8 million sustains teaching operations, maintenance, rehabilitation, and associated initiatives. He affirmed, “Despite challenging circumstances, we persevere.”

Comparatively, Jabban noted that Cairo University’s 2023 budget totaled $500 million, while a Saudi university received $3 billion. He emphasized that Syrian universities, despite adversity and financial constraints, persist in delivering education, yielding notable scientific achievements.

 

This article was translated and edited by The Syrian Observer. The Syrian Observer has not verified the content of this story. Responsibility for the information and views set out in this article lies entirely with the author.

Helpful keywords